German Flame Throwers

Only Engineers carry and use flamethrowers and usually attached to infantry units down to the smallest assault detachments . Two engineers with a flamethrower may be included in a raiding patrol, but normally they are with the larger patrols who will clear the way forward and provide them with covering fire.

Flamethrowers are normally used against static targets like pillboxes as they aim for openings or parapits; enemy infantry detachments advance within effective range using smoke or MG42s fire or supported by a single tank. Men carrying flamethrowers are easy targets and have a high casualty rate as the weapon is short-ranged. Fire is usually single short flame bursts used on individuals but sprayed bursts on area targets.

 

Light Portable Flamethrower
(1940 pattern)

Has an annular ring cylindrical section,
like a lifebouy.

Range 30 yards;
fuel for about 80 bursts 1-2 seconds duration

The more powerful Flamethrower Tanks of the Panzer Grenadier units carry 2 tanks of 35 gallons and have a range of about 40 yards and use spray bursts of 3 to 4 minutes.

German Mines

Left: S-Mine 35 Anti-Personnel
Contains about 350 ⅜ins steel balls.

Right: Schϋ Anti-Tank Mine
Light plywood box 5 x 3⅞ x 2 ins



Above: Tellermine
Anti-Tank
Firing pressure 650 pounds (approx).

 

German Divisional Emblems

 

Panzer Divisions

 
 

Other Divisions

 
 

 

Footnote:

Although the 7th/9th Royal Scots captured General Daser, Commander 70th German Infantry Division [70 Infanterie Division], with 2000 of his men,

his Divisional Emblem
was NOT in the list!

 
 

NOW sixty-six years later

I have it, thanks to Mr Jan H. Wigard:

<www.wigard.nl>

 

 

 

70th Infanterie

 

 


 

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